Alexander: Is Kabbalah OK to teach in public schools?

The word “kabbalah” was not mentioned in the Kester class, but its presence seemed unmistakable. Zucker and facilitator wore red knotted strings – frequently used by kabbalah practitioners to ward off the evil eye – around the left wrists. They also used terms – such as “light” and “the opponent” – that are found throughout the L.A. Center’s website and its IRS filings. – L.A. Times story, Seema Mehta reporter

Alexander Murashko asks as the LA Church & State Examiner: Is Kabbalah OK to teach in public schools?

Posted using ShareThis

LA Church & State Examiner Debuts

The Scrooge Report’s church and state stories with a focus on Los Angeles can now be found at Examiner.com.

The LA Church & State Examiner kicked off with Christian college club exists on campus ‘unofficially’

Here’s the lead:

LONG BEACH – An on-campus Christian club at California State University Long Beach is vowing to continue its Bible-based ministry despite losing a federal lawsuit accusing campus officials of violating its constitutional rights by denying the group official status.

Full Story at LA Church & State Examiner

Thank you for visiting!

Newsweek: ‘Christian God’ is Less of a Force

Newsweek writer, Jon Meacham, armed with an erroneous survey, first assures us that the ‘Christian God’ is not dead, then proclaims him as “less of a force in American politics and culture.”

NEWSWEEK’S TWEAKING OF AMERICA: part two in a series
open bible on american flag
By ALEXANDER
TheScroogeReport.com

Thank you, Newsweek! I was beginning to worry God was a no-vote in the 2008 U.S. election, and just when us dumb Americans were trying to figure it all out, you comforted us by saying God was OK and that he is only “less of a force.”

Here’s how Meacham put it after painting a dreary picture of a Southern Baptist school president, about to suffer clinical depression from the survey news of a “less Christian” nation:

There it was, an old term with new urgency: post-Christian. This is not to say that the Christian God is dead, but that he is less of a force in American politics and culture than at any other time in recent memory.

And all though the story headline proclaims, “The End of Christian America,” Meacham, like some Santa Claus listening to our wish list while we are sitting on his lap, attempts to throw us Christians a candy cane to suck on…

Let’s be clear: while the percentage of Christians may be shrinking, rumors of the death of Christianity are greatly exaggerated.

Again, Meacham does not know that Christianity, a faith in Christ, has nothing to do with religion or denomination. In fact the survey is equally misinformed about it’s so-called conclusions.

For example, the survey says:

“The challenge to Christianity in the U.S. does not come from other religions but rather from a rejection of all forms of organized religion.”

FALSE because Christianity is not “challenged” at all. The body of Christ, His Church, survives eternally. Christianity is not about some membership drive either. There will always be challenges to individual Christians because Jesus was challenged some 2,000 years ago. Why should anything be different now?

“One sign of the lack of attachment of Americans to religion is that 27% do not expect a religious funeral at their death.”

Perhaps a better question to determine a growth or decline in the number of Christians, would be to ask, “When you die, where do you think you will go?” Whether someone wants incense burning, a pastor’s message, or gospel music playing at their funeral has no bearing on whether they have a relationship with Christ or not. The “attachment” anyone should desire before death is to Jesus, not religion.

And so it goes… the survey is skewed, the media misinterprets and bangs the drum of ignorance, and Americans are dished a load of nothing.

Although Meacham surmises:

To the surprise of liberals who fear the advent of an evangelical theocracy and to the dismay of religious conservatives who long to see their faith more fully expressed in public life, Christians are now making up a declining percentage of the American population.

He is wrong because theocracy is the furthest thing from the mind of a follower of Christ. Christians express their faith…whether it is understood or seen in public or not. And certainly, no stray survey or misguided journalist can conclude that Christians, those that have experienced the transforming power of Jesus, are “making up a declining percentage.”

Part One: Newsweek Misuses Poll, Flies ‘The End of Christian America’ Banner

DIGG Story!
_______________

Related:
Christianity Will Not Die Out in This Generation
The End of Newsweek?
_______________

LA CHURCH & STATE EXAMINER:
Christian college club exists on campus ‘unofficially’

Newsweek Misuses Poll, Flies ‘The End of Christian America’ Banner

It’s not a small detail, but for most in the media, including Newsweek, the difference between the words “religious affiliation” and a “faith in Christ” (Christianity) does not exist. Apparently unaware that a relationship with Jesus Christ is not about religion or religious affiliation, the words have become interchangeable…especially if they can be used to indicate a decline in faith.

NEWSWEEK’S TWEAKING OF AMERICA: part one in a series
U.S. and Christian flag
By ALEXANDER
TheScroogeReport.com

The non-denominational tag that many Christians take while knowing that having an “affiliation” is not the key, also appears to not have been a factor in a recently released survey and subsequent opinion from Newsweek. The “scoop” has the publisher waving the “The End of Christian America” banner headline.

Newsweek staff and writer, Jon Meacham, took the liberty to interpret that a 2009 American Religious Identification Survey showing that “the number of Americans who claim no religious affiliation has nearly doubled since 1990, rising from 8 to 15 percent,” means that Christianity is on the decline in America.

Sucking blood out of a rock, Meacham leads his opinion piece by framing a prominent Baptist school president as being “despairing” and someone who had “grown even gloomier” since the poll results…and since, more than likely, the president began fielding questions from Meacham, who appears to have hedged his interview with pre-conceived notions and this Christian-shattering survey.

Meacham uses plenty of drama in the lead of his story, garnering some geographical data from the poll to illustrate some seismic shift in the “religious” makeup of the United States. Too bad he didn’t investigate further into the movements of the “non-denominational” or growing number of “born againers”…two affiliations missing from the story.

Meacham’s lead in Newsweek, published online April 4th:

It was a small detail, a point of comparison buried in the fifth paragraph on the 17th page of a 24-page summary of the 2009 American Religious Identification Survey. But as R. Albert Mohler Jr.—president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, one of the largest on earth—read over the document after its release in March, he was struck by a single sentence. For a believer like Mohler—a starched, unflinchingly conservative Christian, steeped in the theology of his particular province of the faith, devoted to producing ministers who will preach the inerrancy of the Bible and the Gospel of Jesus Christ as the only means to eternal life—the central news of the survey was troubling enough: the number of Americans who claim no religious affiliation has nearly doubled since 1990, rising from 8 to 15 percent. Then came the point he could not get out of his mind: while the unaffiliated have historically been concentrated in the Pacific Northwest, the report said, “this pattern has now changed, and the Northeast emerged in 2008 as the new stronghold of the religiously unidentified.” As Mohler saw it, the historic foundation of America’s religious culture was cracking.

To be a Christian is not about being “steeped in theology” or being defined by a “particular province of faith.” To be a Christian is not about proclaiming affiliation to a religion…especially in a survey. A Christian proclaims the Good News of Jesus Christ in many ways, mostly by the life he or she lives.

The “historic foundation of America’s religious culture” maybe “cracking,” but the power that moves people to shout the Good News of Jesus, to give up all to further His kingdom, and to live in any part of the country or world to do so is unshakable…regardless of the prevailing media or social thought.

It’s a bit early in the game to be smash-mouthing Christians…especially when the Newsweeks of the world want to be a part of tweaking America in the wrong direction.

…to be continued in part two.

DIGG story!

Moment of Silence Survives in Texas

It’s a given that the Christian faith is under attack in the U.S. on many fronts. Secularists, agnostics, and atheists emboldened by the false understanding of what America’s forefathers meant by the separation of church and state have filed lawsuit after lawsuit after lawsuit.

Students praying

By ALEXANDER
TheScroogeReport.com

So paranoid of a “Christian influence” are some of these groups, that suits are now filed at the mere whiff of anything even remotely spiritual.

I had no idea that moments of silence were now found to be objectionable as well. That is until I read today’s story in the Christian Post, Court Upholds Texas Moment of Silence Law as Constitutional.

A federal appeals court upheld on Monday a Texas law allowing students to observe a moment of silence at the beginning of each school day.

A three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling, rejecting a North Texas couple’s claim that the moment of silence law, which took effect in 2003, was unconstitutional.

The panel ruled that the statute is “facially neutral between religious and non-religious activities that students can choose to engage in during the moment of silence.”

After the ruling, David Cortman, senior legal counsel for the Alliance Defense Fund which filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the case last year, stated, “A moment of silence is not a government endorsement of religion just because someone might use the time for prayer.

“No student is compelled to pray under the Texas law. The 5th Circuit was right to uphold the district court’s determination that the law is not an establishment of religion.”

Afraid of silence…

In 2006, David and Shannon Croft sued on behalf of their three children, who attend school in the Carrolton-Farmers Branch Independent School District. They argued that the 2003 amendment that specified the moment of silence as a time for students to “reflect, pray, meditate, or engage in any other silent activity that is not likely to interfere with or distract another student” was an endorsement of prayer.

Better than Ritalin…

Texas Attorney General Abbott who maintained that the 2003 statute was constitutional, commented, “The United States Constitution plainly protects young Texans’ right to observe a moment of silence before school each morning.”

“In an age where children are bombarded with distractions, beginning each school day with a moment of silence offers a welcome moment of quiet contemplation,” he added.

To be intolerant of a moment of silence is lunacy. Perhaps some of us Americans need to take the iPod earplugs out of our ears, turn off the cell phone, get away from the TV, enter a quiet place and listen…someone may be calling you. May you find Him now!
_______________

Tracking…

“Fast Forward post-election, the dust has settled, ACORN’s man won, and guess who is being summoned to help in the 2010 Census? ACORN. Yes you heard it right.” – The Liberal Heretic: The Census Has Officially Been Hijacked by the Left

UC Hastings College of the Law can deny recognition and funding to a Christian student group because it excludes gays, lesbians and non-Christians, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. – San Francisco Chronicle: Christian law group loses fight with Hastings
_______________

DIGG Post!