Goldberg: ‘Lamestream media’ runs with 2nd-hand stress angle

Most news agencies avoid the possibility that the Fort Hood massacre was a terrorist act, says media analyst Bernie Goldberg

While prayers go out to the families and survivors of those killed or injured during the worst mass shooting on an American military base, I can’t help but notice that the the majority of the rampant speculation as to what the motive might have been for Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan is flat out spin.

The investigation of the rampage which included more than 100 shots that left 13 dead and more than two dozen wounded, including the alleged shooter, Army psychiatrist Hasan, should not be about making sure we are politically correct.

There is a wealth of information that now shows that Hasan premeditated this attack … all the while spewing U.S. policy hate and Muslim jihadist verbiage.

“We shouldn’t jump to conclusions,” said President Barack Obama yesterday. Well, we shouldn’t jump to naive theories either.

Hasan may have acted alone, but he did have a team of enablers co-signing his rants. Now, the question remains … Can America continue to absorb those that hate the very host that harbors them?

Court orders Christian homeschooled girl to attend public school

LACONIA, New Hampshire — A homeschooled girl has been ordered into government-run public school for having a “bit too sincerely held” Christian beliefs, according to a legal team specializing in religious liberty defense.
Statue of Liberty
In a report available online at the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) Web site, it states:

“Although the marital master making recommendations to the court agreed the child is ‘well liked, social and interactive with her peers, academically promising, and intellectually at or superior to grade level’ and that ‘it is clear that the home schooling…has more than kept up with the academic requirements of the…public school system,’ he nonetheless proposed that the Christian girl be ordered into a government-run school after considering ‘the impact of [her religious] beliefs on her interaction with others.’ The court approved the order.”

ADF allied attorney John Anthony Simmons has filed motions with a New Hampshire court, asking it to reconsider its order to send the 10-year-old homeschooled girl into public school.

Simmons said the court acknowledges that the girl in question is doing well socially and academically, but he adds that the court went too far when they determined that the girl’s Christian faith was a “bit too sincerely held and must be sifted, tested by, and mixed among other worldviews.”

Simmons contends that parents have a “fundamental right to make educational choices for their children.” However, the girl’s parents divorced in 1999, and she is now living with her mother who has been homeschooling the child since first grade. As part of the schooling, the young girl has been attending supplemental public school classes.

As part of parental custody hearings, a court-appointed guardian (marital master) stated that the child reflected her mother’s “rigidity” on questions of faith and added that girl’s best interest would be served by exposure to a public school setting.

According to the New Hampshire Supreme Court, Home Education is an enduring American tradition and right. ADF concludes, based on that statement, that there is no legitimate legal basis for this latest court ruling.

Sources: OneNewsNow.com and the Alliance Defense Fund.

Idaho education blocks Bible as literature, historic influence class

Charter school planned “not to teach religion” but state’s education panel rules against using Bible

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A state education panel has blocked a school’s plan to teach about the Bible.

The Idaho Public Charter School Commission said in a statement last week that the state Constitution “expressly” limits use of religious texts.

The Nampa Classical Academy, in southwestern Idaho, had said it planned to teach about the literary and historic influence of the Bible — not to teach religion.

The Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Alliance Defense Fund, a religious liberty group, represented the academy and had argued that the writers of Idaho’s Constitution “sought assurances that the right of public schools to use the Bible as a teaching tool would be protected.” Nampa Classical Academy has a statutory right to choose its own curriculum, the defense fund argued.

Kyle Borger, chairman of the academy’s board, said the school will follow the commission’s directive. The school serves more than 550 students and is scheduled to open Sept. 8.

Florida H.S. principal, A.D. face contempt charge for praying before lunch

From Lodi, Calif. to Pace, Fla., the right to pray in public settings remains on center stage this week as a legal issue.

While the Lodi City Council puts using “Jesus” name on hold in its invocations, many in the community of Pace struggle to understand why prayer is being outlawed.

Fox 10 News in Florida reports that it’s all because of a blessing before a school luncheon. Now, a high school principal and athletic director have criminal contempt charges to answer to. FULL STORY AT LA CHURCH & STATE EXAMINER

 

Lawsuit: H.S. coach fired by Muslim principal for student conversion

A former high school wrestling coach filed a federal lawsuit Monday against a Dearborn, Mich., high school and its Muslim principal a year after being fired.

Gerald Marszalek, who coached wrestling for 35 years, claims his contract with Fordson High School was terminated because of his association with a Christian volunteer coach, who the principal accused of converting a Muslim student to Christianity.

“We are getting a glimpse of what happens when Muslims who refuse to accept American values and principles gain political power in an American community,” said Richard Thompson, president and chief counsel of Thomas More Law Center, which filed the lawsuit on the former coach’s behalf.

The law firm is suing for violation of constitutional rights to free speech and exercise of religion, and Michigan laws against discrimination. Marszalek is seeking his back pay, injunctive and declaratory relief, damages, and to be reinstated as coach of the wrestling team.

Conflict arose more than three years ago when Marszalek’s volunteer assistant, Trey Hancock, held a summer wrestling camp where a Muslim camper converted.

According to Thomas More Law Center, Fordson High School principal Imad Fadlallah punched the student who converted and told him he had disgraced his family.

Fadlallah ordered Marszalek to ban his assistant from the school and all wrestling events.

Hancock, a pastor of the Dearborn Assembly of God, said last year that he never mixed religion with sports.

But complying with the school, he stopped his work as an assistant.

Hancock, however, had a son on the wrestling team and attended the wrestling meets to support his son. A Muslim parent complained to the principal that the coach didn’t do enough to keep Hancock away from the students, Marszalek explained to FoxNews.com last year.

After the wrestling season ended, the school did not allow Marszalek, also a Christian, to reapply to his coaching position.

“Failure to renew coach Marszalek’s contract had nothing to do with wrestling and everything to do with religion,” Thompson said.

The city of Dearborn has a large Muslim population. An estimated 30,000 of its 98,000 residents are Muslims, according to Thomas More Law Center.

By Nathan Black, Christian Post